How to tie the stop knot using power gum

This handy little knot is definitely one to know how to tie because there are times when a float rig will be the best option for catching a few sea fish, and you will need to use some form of a knot to prevent sliding floats from riding all the way up your mainline.

Although this can be tied using another length of line, using powergum is better. Powergum is a thick rubber-like like having a little stretch, so when it's pulled tight it really bites onto your mainline ensuring that the knot doesn't slip and slide along the line.

This knot can be tied onto your mainline, at any point above the float, and when the float rig is cast out, the float will ride up the mainline until it hits the stop knot, locking the rig at the required depth.

Another great aspect of this knot is that the knot can be wound through the rod rings, enabling rigs that are set to extreme depth to be cast easily and effectively.

Here's how to tie it...

1 Keep the line to which the stop knot is being tied tight. Hold the Power Gum agains the mono with 75mm or so protruding

1 Keep the line to which the stop knot is being tied tight. Hold the Power Gum agains the mono with 75mm or so protruding

2 Make four turns of Power Gum around the mono line and your index finger

2 Make four turns of Power Gum around the mono line and your index finger

3 Now push the end of the Power Gum through the four turns next to your index finger

3 Now push the end of the Power Gum through the four turns next to your index finger

4 Pull up the knot loosely

4 Pull up the knot loosely

5 Snug the knot tight slowly, then cut tag ends the sharp scissors

5 Snug the knot tight slowly, then cut tag ends the sharp scissors

How to tie the blood loop knot

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The blood loop, used here to create a stand-off boom to take a hook snood, uses no additional components like swivels, beads, crimps or stop knots. As Paul Kerry explains it is cheap, does the job and you won’t mind losing it in a snag

The blood loop is probably the most basic fixed-point method of attaching your hook snood to a paternoster style trace body.

It is simple, reasonably effective and cheap making it ideal if you fish rough ground where tackle losses are likely to be quite high.

More importantly it is one of the essential basic knots for sea angling and in this case I’m using it to create a simple stand-off boom.

From this knot there are several variations that are useful for snood connections on different trace set-ups and I will be looking at these in the months ahead.

1. Decide the position on the trace body that you want to connect the hook snood, then make a loop in the line as shown

1. Decide the position on the trace body that you want to connect the hook snood, then make a loop in the line as shown

2. Hold the line where it crosses and twist one around the other approximately four times. I keep the numbers of turns fairly low with thick line, as I find the knot tightens better giving higher strength. You also need to keep the line apart at the centre of the twist to create a ‘hole’

2. Hold the line where it crosses and twist one around the other approximately four times. I keep the numbers of turns fairly low with thick line, as I find the knot tightens better giving higher strength. You also need to keep the line apart at the centre of the twist to create a ‘hole’

3. Bring the middle of the loop back through the centre of the twists. Pull the loop through enough to create the size you want when the knot is completed

3. Bring the middle of the loop back through the centre of the twists. Pull the loop through enough to create the size you want when the knot is completed

4. Moisten coils and gradually pull each end to tighten knot. If the coils stick then ease them with your fingers. Try not to pull with excessive force until the coils are fully home

4. Moisten coils and gradually pull each end to tighten knot. If the coils stick then ease them with your fingers. Try not to pull with excessive force until the coils are fully home

5. The completed blood loop. This can be used to connect with a loop tied in the end of the hook snood or by tying the hooklength directly to the loop

5. The completed blood loop. This can be used to connect with a loop tied in the end of the hook snood or by tying the hooklength directly to the loop

6. The blood loop can be made to stand at right angles from the trace body line by pushing a length of hard plastic tube over the loop as shown. This forms a short boom, which helps prevent tangles and boosts bait presentation

6. The blood loop can be made to stand at right angles from the trace body line by pushing a length of hard plastic tube over the loop as shown. This forms a short boom, which helps prevent tangles and boosts bait presentation

7. An even better stand-off boom can be achieved by threading a short length of silicon tubing onto the hook snood. Tie the snood to the end of the loop and push the tubing back over the loop, hard against the end of the tube. This works well on short hook snood flapper rigs

7. An even better stand-off boom can be achieved by threading a short length of silicon tubing onto the hook snood. Tie the snood to the end of the loop and push the tubing back over the loop, hard against the end of the tube. This works well on short hook snood flapper rigs

How to tie the grinner knot

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This knot is widely used by match, pleasure and specialist anglers wordwide, for linking hooks and swivels to either mainline, hooklength or even braid.

It is a very strong and relaible knot that should be dampened thoroughly before it is pulled tight.

As this knot features a small amount of whipping above the swivel or hook eye it does not 'strangle' the item being tied, therefore it retains a huge amount of strength.

STEP 1

Pass your chosen hooklength through the eye of your hook or swivel twice. Pull 4ins of the hooklength through. Now form a loop with the tag end of the hooklength.

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Step 2

Thread the tag end over the hooklength and through the loop four times, making sure it exits through the loop.

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STEP 3

Moisten the knot thoroughly with saliva and gradually pull it to lock the knot against your hook eye or swivel eye. Trim any waste from the hooklength tag end as close as you can to the knot.

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How to tie the water knot

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The water knot has many uses for the angler. It can be used to link hooklength to mainline, it can be used to join a paternoster link to a mainline, and it can even be used to join mono to braid.

Many anglers use this knot to link their pole mainline to the hooklength, especially when fishing delicate rigs, because it is far more direct than the more commonly used loop to loop technique.

STEP 1

Lay the two lines you wish to tie alongside each other.

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STEP 2

Form a substantial loop using the two lines

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STEP 3

Ensure the two lengths of line are together and thread the pair of tags ends through the loop three times.

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STEP 4

Moisten the knot with saliva or water and slowly pull it tight. Trim off the tag ends accordingly to either create a straight profile when joining a mainline to hooklength, or cut the tag ends to create a paternoster link for legering purposes.

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