How to tie the blood loop knot

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The blood loop, used here to create a stand-off boom to take a hook snood, uses no additional components like swivels, beads, crimps or stop knots. As Paul Kerry explains it is cheap, does the job and you won’t mind losing it in a snag

The blood loop is probably the most basic fixed-point method of attaching your hook snood to a paternoster style trace body.

It is simple, reasonably effective and cheap making it ideal if you fish rough ground where tackle losses are likely to be quite high.

More importantly it is one of the essential basic knots for sea angling and in this case I’m using it to create a simple stand-off boom.

From this knot there are several variations that are useful for snood connections on different trace set-ups and I will be looking at these in the months ahead.

1. Decide the position on the trace body that you want to connect the hook snood, then make a loop in the line as shown

1. Decide the position on the trace body that you want to connect the hook snood, then make a loop in the line as shown

2. Hold the line where it crosses and twist one around the other approximately four times. I keep the numbers of turns fairly low with thick line, as I find the knot tightens better giving higher strength. You also need to keep the line apart at the centre of the twist to create a ‘hole’

2. Hold the line where it crosses and twist one around the other approximately four times. I keep the numbers of turns fairly low with thick line, as I find the knot tightens better giving higher strength. You also need to keep the line apart at the centre of the twist to create a ‘hole’

3. Bring the middle of the loop back through the centre of the twists. Pull the loop through enough to create the size you want when the knot is completed

3. Bring the middle of the loop back through the centre of the twists. Pull the loop through enough to create the size you want when the knot is completed

4. Moisten coils and gradually pull each end to tighten knot. If the coils stick then ease them with your fingers. Try not to pull with excessive force until the coils are fully home

4. Moisten coils and gradually pull each end to tighten knot. If the coils stick then ease them with your fingers. Try not to pull with excessive force until the coils are fully home

5. The completed blood loop. This can be used to connect with a loop tied in the end of the hook snood or by tying the hooklength directly to the loop

5. The completed blood loop. This can be used to connect with a loop tied in the end of the hook snood or by tying the hooklength directly to the loop

6. The blood loop can be made to stand at right angles from the trace body line by pushing a length of hard plastic tube over the loop as shown. This forms a short boom, which helps prevent tangles and boosts bait presentation

6. The blood loop can be made to stand at right angles from the trace body line by pushing a length of hard plastic tube over the loop as shown. This forms a short boom, which helps prevent tangles and boosts bait presentation

7. An even better stand-off boom can be achieved by threading a short length of silicon tubing onto the hook snood. Tie the snood to the end of the loop and push the tubing back over the loop, hard against the end of the tube. This works well on short hook snood flapper rigs

7. An even better stand-off boom can be achieved by threading a short length of silicon tubing onto the hook snood. Tie the snood to the end of the loop and push the tubing back over the loop, hard against the end of the tube. This works well on short hook snood flapper rigs