How to tie a mono twisted boom to prevent tangles

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There's no doubt that booms improve bait presentation and help eliminate tangles. Here Paul Kerry shows how to make a mono twisted boom that can be fished as either a flapper or clipped down rig...

HERE’S ANOTHER VARIATION of the blood loop used as a fixed position hook snood connection point. What you end up with is a very flexible, thin boom that has enough stiffness to hold the snood clear of the trace line for flapper rigs, but is fl exible enough to use clipped down as well.

Its nylon construction keeps weight down and minimises trace costs. It is most effective with short hook snoods. In fact I have used it with a worm bait filling a very short hook snood so it hangs directly off the end of the boom. That makes it almost totally tangle free.

1. Hold the trace line between fingers and thumb and form a loop. The initial size isn’t too important as the finished boom length can be adjusted later. Make it a reasonable size

1. Hold the trace line between fingers and thumb and form a loop. The initial size isn’t too important as the finished boom length can be adjusted later. Make it a reasonable size

2. Holding one end of the line still, roll the other end between your finger and thumb turning the line to generate twists in the loop. Form a few twists, then…

2. Holding one end of the line still, roll the other end between your finger and thumb turning the line to generate twists in the loop. Form a few twists, then…

3. Pull each end away from the other, forcing twists towards the end of the loop, and tighten them. Continue twisting and tightening until you get required boom length

3. Pull each end away from the other, forcing twists towards the end of the loop, and tighten them. Continue twisting and tightening until you get required boom length

4. Once the boom is formed you take the trace line and loop the ends round. Then put in about four turns as you would when tying an ordinary blood loop

4. Once the boom is formed you take the trace line and loop the ends round. Then put in about four turns as you would when tying an ordinary blood loop

5. Take the end of the mono boom and pass it through the centre of the turns of your knot

5. Take the end of the mono boom and pass it through the centre of the turns of your knot

6. Moisten the turns then gradually pull the ends of the trace line to fully bed down the knot. Ease gently with your fingers to avoid line damage

6. Moisten the turns then gradually pull the ends of the trace line to fully bed down the knot. Ease gently with your fingers to avoid line damage

7. You can improve the stand-off ability by threading a short length of silicone tubing on your hook snood. This can be pushed over the snood knot and onto the end of your mono boom

7. You can improve the stand-off ability by threading a short length of silicone tubing on your hook snood. This can be pushed over the snood knot and onto the end of your mono boom

8. The boom also has the flexibility to be used with clipped rigs. After release it will flick back straight to keep the snood clear of the main trace line. The bait clip needs to be of a type that has movement to ensure correct set up. It’s virtually impossible to tie to a fixed bait clip

8. The boom also has the flexibility to be used with clipped rigs. After release it will flick back straight to keep the snood clear of the main trace line. The bait clip needs to be of a type that has movement to ensure correct set up. It’s virtually impossible to tie to a fixed bait clip

How to tie the two-hook flapper

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The two-hook flapper follows the traditional monofilament paternoster design, which can be constructed with one, two or even three hooks.

For big fish or rough ground, one hook is the logical choice while for small fish taken over clear ground three hooks offer better odds of successful fishing.

Two hooks are a popular compromise and very often the choice of the freelance angler for runof- the-mill venues and also mixed species fishing.

The term flapper refers to the fact that the hook snoods hang loose and flap during the cast, so obviously, it is not the rig to choose if you need to fish a long-range.

When distance is a priority clip down the bait close to the main trace line. We have shown you how to do this in earlier rig building sequences in this series.

For uncomplicated short and middle range casting from piers and beaches and for a host of species, the two-hook flapper is hard to beat.

1. Cut the rig bodyline at an angle with your line clippers, the point makes threading the swivels crimps and beads easier. Slide on a crimp followed by a micro bead then one of the 45lb swivels, then another micro bead and another crimp. Repeat this for each hook snood you want to create

1. Cut the rig bodyline at an angle with your line clippers, the point makes threading the swivels crimps and beads easier. Slide on a crimp followed by a micro bead then one of the 45lb swivels, then another micro bead and another crimp. Repeat this for each hook snood you want to create

2. With all the components in place, you should double-check they are in the right sequence. Then you add the Genie lead link to the end of the line with a three-turn grinner knot

2. With all the components in place, you should double-check they are in the right sequence. Then you add the Genie lead link to the end of the line with a three-turn grinner knot

3. Measure out the length of the rig, between 3ft and 5ft is most popular, then cut the line and tie on the top clip or swivel, again using a grinner knot

3. Measure out the length of the rig, between 3ft and 5ft is most popular, then cut the line and tie on the top clip or swivel, again using a grinner knot

4. Position the 45lb swivels with beads and crimps either side along the length of the rig body and secure in place by lightly crushing the crimps with crimping pliers. Pinched lightly they can be adjusted to suit hook snood positions.

4. Position the 45lb swivels with beads and crimps either side along the length of the rig body and secure in place by lightly crushing the crimps with crimping pliers. Pinched lightly they can be adjusted to suit hook snood positions.

5. Now tie the hook snoods on the swivels using a three-turn Grinner knot. Snood lengths, usually between 12in and 20in long, are critical in relation to the swivel spacing on the rig’s mainline. Do not allow the hooks to overlap the snood or link above or below because they will tangle.

5. Now tie the hook snoods on the swivels using a three-turn Grinner knot. Snood lengths, usually between 12in and 20in long, are critical in relation to the swivel spacing on the rig’s mainline. Do not allow the hooks to overlap the snood or link above or below because they will tangle.

Construction tips

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● The rig’s overall length can be varied to suit particular venues, conditions or species. A short, stubby 3ft long rig is ideal for fi shing from high piers or rock marks because it puts bait closer to the sea bed. A short rig with short snoods can also be cast further.

● Longer 5ft-plus rigs spread hook baits over a wider area and are the ideal choice for surf or estuary fi shing. In surf a longer rig increases the chances of placing bait where the surf gouges the sand and marine life, a notorious hot spot.

● Longer snoods are usually favoured for some shy-biting species, but if they are used remember to extend the overall length of the rig body.

● If fi shing at short range from high venues like piers, the top hook is likely to be lifted off the bottom by the angle of the mainline. Make the top snood slightly longer than the bottom snood to allow for this.

● Beads or sequins are optional attractors on the hook snoods and can be held in position by adding a bait stop above them. Make these from 1cm length of silicon sleeving. Pass the line through the sleeve twice and then pull the line tight to form the stopping device.

● Snood line breaking strain depends on what the rig is being used for. In general 25lb is the choice in winter because it can cope with the teeth of small fi sh.

How to tie a conger rig

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It is important to remember that conger eels have strong jaws and sharp teeth, so they will make short work of a normal hooklength. That means you need a strong hooklength and Malcolm suggests 150lb mono.

The actual rig is a simple running leger with the 150lb hooklength carrying a size 8/0 or 10/0 O’Shaughnessy pattern hook. The lead weight is clipped on a simple zip slider, which is threaded either directly on the reel’s mono mainline or on a mono leader tied to braid mainline. Make sure you place a bead either side of the swivel. The mainline and hooklength attach to a strong rolling swivel, so choose a quality brand with a breaking strain of at least 100lb.

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You'll need size 8/0 or 10/0 hooks, strong swivels and zip sliders

1. Thread the end of your 150lb mono line through the eye of your hook and start the knot by taking the line four times around itself

1. Thread the end of your 150lb mono line through the eye of your hook and start the knot by taking the line four times around itself

2. Take the end of the line through the loop nearest the eye and then back through the large loop. Wet the line with saliva and begin to pull tight

2. Take the end of the line through the loop nearest the eye and then back through the large loop. Wet the line with saliva and begin to pull tight

3. Once you have teased the knot together, give it a good pull to make it tight and then trim off the tag end with nail clippers or a pair of scissors

3. Once you have teased the knot together, give it a good pull to make it tight and then trim off the tag end with nail clippers or a pair of scissors

4. Cut the your hooklength to about 18 inches and tie a 100lb test swivel on the end. Thread a bead, zip slider and bead on your mainline and tie to the swivel

4. Cut the your hooklength to about 18 inches and tie a 100lb test swivel on the end. Thread a bead, zip slider and bead on your mainline and tie to the swivel

5. It’s worth checking your knots are tight by attaching one end of the swivel to a hook and pulling the line at the other end. Then repeat for the other knot

5. It’s worth checking your knots are tight by attaching one end of the swivel to a hook and pulling the line at the other end. Then repeat for the other knot

6. Add the required plain lead weight to the zip slider and your conger rig is ready for action. All you need now is to attach your mackerel flapper bait

6. Add the required plain lead weight to the zip slider and your conger rig is ready for action. All you need now is to attach your mackerel flapper bait

How to tie the three-hook clipped trace rig

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This is probably the most highly-developed trace in the beach angler's armoury. It is certainly very efficient at delivering small baits big distances without splattering the load across the sky.

THE CLIPPED VERSION of a three-hook mono paternoster rig offers increased casting distance as well as bait care during its flight out to sea.

Hook baits are clipped close to the bodyline of the rig to make the overall trace streamlined. Construction is more complicated because dimensions of each snood needs to be precise so that the hook can be clipped tightly to the clip below.

There are a host of clip systems available, although by far the most efficient and fail safe is the combination of a Breakaway Impact lead and the Breakaway Cascade swivels - no other hook bait clip device comes close. This system clips the lower hook to the Impact system built into the lead and then the hooks on the snoods above clip into a small hook on the Cascade swivel below.

On impact with the sea the lead releases the lower hook, which in turn releases the hooks above in a cascade affect. Other bait clips can jam up and remain clipped up during the duration of the cast.

Competition anglers often use this rig because it offers maximum distance with multi baits. Triple hook baits produce a large scent trail and let the angler try a range of different baits.

The rig is also a favourite among pleasure anglers fishing for smaller species like dabs, whiting, pouting, soles and flounders.

The dimensions of the rig have an effect on how far you can cast and a short stubby rig with all three-hook baits spaced over 4ft will cast further than a rig with three hooks spaced along a 6ft trace.

Hook baits clipped closer to the lead will improve the balance and aerodynamic shape of the rig and that's why the next step for increased distance is the two-up, one-down clipped rig.

However, each rig design and its dimensions offer separate advantages and these should be considered in relation to conditions, venues and the species sought.

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RIG BUILDING TIPS

Hook snood dimensions are critical because if the hook is loose on the bait clip it will fall off too early while it is flying through the air and sometimes before you even cast.

Replacing the crimp below each snood swivel with a mono stop knot or Power Gum stop knot allows the snood to be adjusted up or down the trace body to alter the length and tension, and also makes it far easier to replace your hook snood.

The addition of a Gemini SRT Spring below the top hook snood swivel brings increased tension to all three clipped hooks preventing premature release.

If using crimps to secure the hook snood with swivels and beads make sure the micro beads you use have the correct size hole to allow just the line to pass through them and not the whole crimp.

To tie hooks to snoods lengths accurately, thread on the hook and position where you want it to be after the knot is tied - then move it one inch up the snood and tie off with a five-turn half blood knot. The extra inch allows for the take up of the knot.

Alternatively you can tie hooks to the snoods and then crimp them in position or move the stop knots on the rig body to complete the rig.

Because the hook bait will be forced up the snood during flight each snood needs a bait stop. The most efficient is a 1cm diameter sequin or bead stopped by a tubing stop or stop knot. It can then be adjusted down or up the snood to clamp the bait in position prior to casting.

Hooks between size 2 and 1/0 are best; larger size hooks and bigger baits will make the rig top heavy and force it to spin and wobble during casting.

RIG USES...

Type of fishing: Medium and long range. Suitable for all casting styles, although take care if casting off the ground because hooks can come off their clips. SRT Springs help prevent this. Especially effective for casting delicate baits, which can get ripped off the hooks during power casts.

Types of venue: Ideal for clean beaches, piers and estuaries for smaller species, match fishing and general all-round fishing when bites are important.

Species: Pouting, whiting, dabs, flounders, soles, codling, dogfish and other small fish as well as match fishing.

Hook size: Size 2 up to 1/0 (strong long shank pattern)

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Swivels trapped between beads and stop knots are moveable so snoods can be snugged up tight on their bait clips

Swivels trapped between beads and stop knots are moveable so snoods can be snugged up tight on their bait clips

Close-up of a Cascade swivel - note that the handy bait clip is built into the swivel

Close-up of a Cascade swivel - note that the handy bait clip is built into the swivel

Baits are prevented blowing up the snood by a sequin stop, again adjustable due to a Power gum stop

Baits are prevented blowing up the snood by a sequin stop, again adjustable due to a Power gum stop

The bait clip built into the Breakaway Impact lead holds the bottom hook of the rig in place

The bait clip built into the Breakaway Impact lead holds the bottom hook of the rig in place

A Gemini SRT Springs tensions the snood so the hook does not slip off its bait clip

A Gemini SRT Springs tensions the snood so the hook does not slip off its bait clip

How to tie the telephone wire paternoster

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● 60lb mono for the rig body
● 18-25lb mono for snoods
● 1 x 60lb swivel
● 2 x 40lb swivels
● 4 x beads - any size can be used, but most shore anglers prefer micro beads because they tend to catch less weed
● 2 x size 4 to size 1/0 hooks
● 1 x Gemini Genie lead link
● A short length of telephone wire

Standard telephone cable contains various thin coloured plastic coated wires, which can be cut with scissors, cutters or nail clippers.

1   Thread a bead, then a swivel, and then a bead on the 60lb rig bodyline, repeating the sequence for the second snood

1 Thread a bead, then a swivel, and then a bead on the 60lb rig bodyline, repeating the sequence for the second snood

2   Tie a Genie link to the end of the rig line using a three-turn Grinner knot or a fi ve-turn half blood. Measure the rig at 5ft, cut and tie on 60lb swivel

2 Tie a Genie link to the end of the rig line using a three-turn Grinner knot or a fi ve-turn half blood. Measure the rig at 5ft, cut and tie on 60lb swivel

3   Scrounge some scrap telephone wire. The main cable can be opened out to reveal the thin, plastic coated coloured wire

3 Scrounge some scrap telephone wire. The main cable can be opened out to reveal the thin, plastic coated coloured wire

4   Take a length of the telephone wire and twist it around the rig body above and below the beads either side of the bottom swivel

4 Take a length of the telephone wire and twist it around the rig body above and below the beads either side of the bottom swivel

5   This traps the swivel between the two beads. Eight turns is enough and allows the swivel to be moved. Repeat for the top snood

5 This traps the swivel between the two beads. Eight turns is enough and allows the swivel to be moved. Repeat for the top snood

6   Tie on the hook snoods and then the hooks using a grinner or half blood knot so that they do not overlap each other, the lead link or top swivel

6 Tie on the hook snoods and then the hooks using a grinner or half blood knot so that they do not overlap each other, the lead link or top swivel

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How to tie the two-hook paternoster

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Components

Lead link

Size 1 swivel to top of the trace

Four crimps

Two size 3 swivels for attaching snoods

Four micro beads

Two size 1/0 to 3/0 Kamasan B940

60lb mono for trace body

25lb mono for hooklengths.

1. Tie the top swivel to the end of the trace body using a   grinner   knot

1. Tie the top swivel to the end of the trace body using a grinner knot

2. The rig body should be 36in long, but cut 42in to allow for the knot

2. The rig body should be 36in long, but cut 42in to allow for the knot

3. Chamfer the end of the line with a blade

3. Chamfer the end of the line with a blade

4. Slide on a crimp, bead, swivel, bead and crimp and repeat, then tie on the lead link

4. Slide on a crimp, bead, swivel, bead and crimp and repeat, then tie on the lead link

5. Fix the lower snood swivel at 5 or 6inches from the lead link

5. Fix the lower snood swivel at 5 or 6inches from the lead link

6. Fix the top snood swivel at 24in from the lead link

6. Fix the top snood swivel at 24in from the lead link

7. Tie a hooklength to each swivel

7. Tie a hooklength to each swivel

8. The top snood should be 10in long and bottom one 15in long

8. The top snood should be 10in long and bottom one 15in long

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