How to tie a mono twisted boom to prevent tangles

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There's no doubt that booms improve bait presentation and help eliminate tangles. Here Paul Kerry shows how to make a mono twisted boom that can be fished as either a flapper or clipped down rig...

HERE’S ANOTHER VARIATION of the blood loop used as a fixed position hook snood connection point. What you end up with is a very flexible, thin boom that has enough stiffness to hold the snood clear of the trace line for flapper rigs, but is fl exible enough to use clipped down as well.

Its nylon construction keeps weight down and minimises trace costs. It is most effective with short hook snoods. In fact I have used it with a worm bait filling a very short hook snood so it hangs directly off the end of the boom. That makes it almost totally tangle free.

1. Hold the trace line between fingers and thumb and form a loop. The initial size isn’t too important as the finished boom length can be adjusted later. Make it a reasonable size

1. Hold the trace line between fingers and thumb and form a loop. The initial size isn’t too important as the finished boom length can be adjusted later. Make it a reasonable size

2. Holding one end of the line still, roll the other end between your finger and thumb turning the line to generate twists in the loop. Form a few twists, then…

2. Holding one end of the line still, roll the other end between your finger and thumb turning the line to generate twists in the loop. Form a few twists, then…

3. Pull each end away from the other, forcing twists towards the end of the loop, and tighten them. Continue twisting and tightening until you get required boom length

3. Pull each end away from the other, forcing twists towards the end of the loop, and tighten them. Continue twisting and tightening until you get required boom length

4. Once the boom is formed you take the trace line and loop the ends round. Then put in about four turns as you would when tying an ordinary blood loop

4. Once the boom is formed you take the trace line and loop the ends round. Then put in about four turns as you would when tying an ordinary blood loop

5. Take the end of the mono boom and pass it through the centre of the turns of your knot

5. Take the end of the mono boom and pass it through the centre of the turns of your knot

6. Moisten the turns then gradually pull the ends of the trace line to fully bed down the knot. Ease gently with your fingers to avoid line damage

6. Moisten the turns then gradually pull the ends of the trace line to fully bed down the knot. Ease gently with your fingers to avoid line damage

7. You can improve the stand-off ability by threading a short length of silicone tubing on your hook snood. This can be pushed over the snood knot and onto the end of your mono boom

7. You can improve the stand-off ability by threading a short length of silicone tubing on your hook snood. This can be pushed over the snood knot and onto the end of your mono boom

8. The boom also has the flexibility to be used with clipped rigs. After release it will flick back straight to keep the snood clear of the main trace line. The bait clip needs to be of a type that has movement to ensure correct set up. It’s virtually impossible to tie to a fixed bait clip

8. The boom also has the flexibility to be used with clipped rigs. After release it will flick back straight to keep the snood clear of the main trace line. The bait clip needs to be of a type that has movement to ensure correct set up. It’s virtually impossible to tie to a fixed bait clip